Profile page for UW-Madison Professor Rachel Winkle-Wagner

Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis Banner
Medical imaging Carillon Tower Glass blowing Laptop and lecture A smiling student Sunrise over the Education Building Chairs on the Memorial Union Terrace Bascom hall staircase Graduating students in silhouette Crowd of people on Bascom Hill A student tutoring Student with diploma Dance Department performance Night view of Bascom in the winter Memorial Union Terrace in autumn Memorial Union Terrace chairs Dance department performance Bucky Badger in front of a parade float Bascom Hall in the summertime Lincoln statue Students walking in the snow University of Wisconsin - Madison Crest Lincoln statue in the snow Forward Logo Student at graduation Bicycle in the snow Rathskellar Fireplace Sailboat with Capitol Building in the background A sailboat at the Memorial Union Bascom Hill in Autumn Bucky Badger studying with a student. Students among blooming trees at UW-Madison Bucky reading a book University flag on Bascom Hill Video camera view screen Student on a frozen lake Lincoln Statue on Bascom Hill Bascom Hill in winter Students collaborating Memorial Union Terrace chairs in the snow Kohl Center logo Graduates with diplomas A hands-on project Stacked, illuminated figures View from the top of Van Hise
shadow

CONTACTING US

Main Office

Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis
School of Education
UW-Madison
253 Education Building
1000 Bascom Mall
MadisonWI  53706-1326

Tel: 608/262-3106
Fax: 608/265-3135

Email: elpa@education.wisc.edu
or by contact form
Facebook Logo
 

Rachelle Winkle-Wagner

Profile Photo

Rachelle Winkle-Wagner


Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis (ELPA)

270K Education Building  binoculars icon
1000 Bascom Mall
Madison, WI 53706-1326
Office: 608/265-4955

winklewagner@wisc.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Personal Biography

Rachelle Winkle-Wagner earned her PhD from Indiana University in Education Policy Studies with a concentration in higher education and minors in sociology and qualitative inquiry. Prior to coming to UW-Madison, she held positions on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Nebraska – Lincoln.


Education

BA, Communication Studies and Piano Performance, Spanish
University of Nebraska
Lincoln, NE

MA, Higher Education, Student Affairs
University of Nebraska
Lincoln, NE

Ph D, Education Policy Studies, Higher Education, Sociology, Qualitative Inquiry
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN


 

 

Teaching Interests

Introduction to research, diversity in higher education, qualitative methodology, sociology of higher education

Scheduled Teaching

  • Fall 2013 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 066, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2013 - Leadership for Equity & Diversity in Higher Ed
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 005, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Seminar
    Course Syllabus
     
  • Fall 2013 - Research Methods and Procedures in Educational Administration
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 725, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Seminar
    Course Syllabus
     
  • Fall 2013 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 066, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2013 - Research Methods and Procedures in Educational Administration
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 725, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Seminar
    Course Syllabus
     
  • Spring 2013 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 066, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2013 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 066, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 9, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2012 - Research Methods and Procedures in Educational Administration
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 725, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     

Research Interests

Rachelle uses sociological approach to investigate how race and gender are manifested in gaining access to and persisting through college. She has completed or is currently conducting research on topics such as: 1.) The experiences and retention strategies of African American women in college; 2.) Access to graduate school for students of color; 3.) Critical qualitative methodology; 4.) The use of theory within empirical research; 5.) Sociological perspectives of identity development; and 6.) Higher education equity in developing nations.

Grants and Sponsorships

  • 2014-2015 - Amount: $41,385.00, "Bringing Themselves To The Academic Table: A Multisite Case Study Of Bi-Directional Academic Socialization For Students Of Color In College," Awarded By: University of Wisconsin - Madison Graduate School (WARF), Sponsor Type: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Rachelle Winkle-Wagner.
    Abstract: This longitudinal, multisite study project seeks to understand how academic learning communities introduce underrepresented students to undergraduate research and strategies for success in college and graduate programs. Interviews with 30 students (three per student) and 30 faculty mentors focus on students’ development of: competencies to help them succeed as undergraduate and graduate students; aspirations toward graduate education; and ways to bring their prior experiences into academia.
  • 7/1/2014 - Amount: $46,507.00, "Portrait Of The Self-Initiated Strategies For Success In College By African American Female College Alumni In Four Metropolitan Areas," Awarded By: University of Wisconsin - Madison Graduate School (WARF), Sponsor Type: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Principal.
    Abstract: How have African American women identified strategies for college success amidst significant barriers? This project combines a life history empirical exploration of the self-determined successful strategies employed by 60 African American female college alumni from ages 22-25 who attended institutions in four major metropolitan areas with a comprehensive 50-year historiography of African American women’s college experiences.
  • 7/1/2013 - Amount: $66,512.00, "Opening The Gates To Graduate-Level Stem Programs: The Needs Of underrepresented students in the state of delaware," Awarded By: Delaware EPSCoR RII - National Science Foundation, Sponsor Type: Federal, Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Co-Principal; Dorian L. McCoy, Co-Principal.
    Abstract: The goals of this study are to: Goal 1: Gain insight into the experiences of students of color in advanced-degree programs in STEM disciplines at the University of Delaware and Delaware State University. Goal 2: Investigate underrepresented, undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of access to advanced-degree programs in the STEM disciplines to foster ideas for better recruiting and retaining underrepresented graduate students in the STEM disciplines. Goal 3: Assess STEM faculty members’ openness to diversity with the aim of making recommendations for creating an environment that promotes the success of underrepresented students in graduate programs.
  • 2009-2012 - Amount: $10,000.00, Awarded By: University of Nebraska Foundation - Layman Award, Grant Institution: University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Sponsor Type: Other, Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Principal.

Publications

  • Carter, D.F., Locks, A.M., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (in press). From when and where I enter: Theoretical and empirical considerations of minority students’ transition to college. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Resear.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: The focus of this chapter is the transition to college for students of color (Asian American, Latina/o, African American, and Native American students). The dominant thrust of much of the scholarship examining the transition to college for students comes from Tinto’s Theory of Student Departure and research using the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ). While such theories have been important for understanding transition, recent theories particular to the experiences of students of color (e.g., acculturation, theory of validation) shed light on future areas for theory and research on transition to college. We discuss other areas of first-year college experiences (financial matters, academic preparation, family and community support) and factors that support such students’ positive acclimation to campus, which include on-campus mentoring, family and/or community support, first-year experience programming, academic support, adequate financial aid, and amelioration of a negative racial climate. We conclude the chapter with recommendations for future directions of theory development and for practice, especially the need for additional research within racial/ethnic groups and by gender.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2013). Get real: The process of validating research across racial lines. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in educational research: Methods at the margins. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., & McCoy, D.L. (2013). Many into one: Using intersectional perspectives to understand Black first-generation college student identities. Living at the intersections: Social identities and Black collegians. New York, NY: Information Age Publishing.
  • Lundy-Wagner, V., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (2013). A harassing climate? The implications of sexual harassment for campus climate. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education. 6(1), 51-68.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: n this conceptual paper, the authors discuss how research about sexual harassment and campus racial climates for undergraduate students is relegated to separate silos. Drawing on intersectionality and critical race feminist frameworks, the authors juxtapose these strands of research with attention to ethnicity/race and gender, highlighting how sexual harassment and racial climate research both aim to promote positive college environments, but with notably different approaches. The authors call for an intersectional approach that appreciates both sexual harassment as well as the racial climate, concluding with recommendations for incorporating both strands of literature into research on educational environments
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Sule, V., & Maramba, D.C. (2013). When Race Disappears: Merit in the College Admissions Policy Decision-Making Process in the State of Texa. Educational Policy.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: What happens to race in public discussions about “race-neutral” college admissions policies? This article shows how race disappeared from elite political debate during hearings on Texas Senate Bill 175 (2009), the Top Ten Percent Plan (the Plan), which guaranteed college admissions to high school graduates from the top 10% of their classes. Findings indicated that race disappeared from the discussion of college admissions policy in Texas. Instead, policy makers emphasized students’ opportunity to compete for college admissions ignoring that the opportunities for and impediments to success at different high schools varied widely across the state. The implication of these findings is that as policy becomes race neutral, discourse also becomes “colorblind” potentially disguising structural and secondary school inequalities.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., & Locks, A.M. (2013). Diversity and Inclusion on Campus: Supporting Racially and Ethnically Underrepresented Students. In Series Editors, Marybeth Gasman and Edward P. St. John (Eds.), Diversity and Inclusion on Campus: Supporting Racially and Ethnically Underrepresented Students. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Diversity and Inclusion provides a new way of thinking about diversity in higher education, moving from considerations of diversity in the student population on college campuses as an adjective (describing students’ diverse characteristics) to thinking about diversity as an action of inclusion. The book synthesizes decades of theorizing and empirical research about racial and ethnic diversity in higher education, with a focus on the process that students of color will encounter as they get into, through, and out of college. Each chapter offers ideas for future theory, research, and practice (including an actionable case study) related to better diversity-and-inclusion efforts in higher education.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Hunter, C.A., & Ortloff, D.J. (2013). Bridging the gap between theory and practice in educational research: Methods at the Margins. In Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Cheryl A. Hunter, Debora J.H. Ortloff (Eds.), Bridging the gap between theory and practice in educational research: Methods at the Margins, (pp. 271 Pages). New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: This book provides new ways of thinking about educational processes using quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Concrete examples of research techniques are provided for those conducting research with marginalized populations or about marginalized ideas. This volume asserts theoretical models related to research methods and the study of underrepresented groups. Ultimately, it aims at expanding knowledge itself - altering the center by allowing the margins to inform it - allowing it to be created and extended to include those ways of knowing that have historically been unexplored or ignored.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Academic Capital Formation: Can it help untangle the confusion about social stratification in the study of college students? Expanding Postsecondary Opportunity for Underrepresented Students: Theory and Practice of Academic Capital Formation. Brooklyn, NY: AMS Press Inc.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Editor's Introduction. Expanding Postsecondary Opportunity for Underrepresented Students: Theory and Practice of Academic Capital Formation. Brooklyn, NY: AMS Press Inc.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Bowman, P.J., & St. John, E.P. (2012). Expanding Postsecondary Opportunity for Underrepresented Students: Theory and Practice of Academic Capital Formation. In Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Phillip J. Bowman, Edward P.St. John (Eds.), Readings on Equal Education, (pp. 314 pages). Brooklyn, NY: AMS Press Inc.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: This volume examines the theoretical framework of academic capital formation as it relates to enacting equity of opportunity for underrepresented students in higher education.
  • McCallum, C., McCoy, D.L., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Finding support one relationship at a time: The importance of faculty and peers among graduate students in HBCUs. Inside the Experiences of Black students in Graduate and Professional Education at HBCUs. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Patton, L., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Race at first sight: The funding of racial scripts between Black and White women. Why can’t we just be friends?: Women of color and White women in the academy. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2012). Self, college experiences, and society: Rethinking student development theory from a sociological perspective. College Student Affairs Journal. 30(2), 45-60.
    Abstract: This article examines the psychological theoretical foundations of college student development theory and the theoretical assumptions of this framework. A complimentary, sociological perspective and the theoretical assumptions of this approach are offered. The potential limitations of the overuse of each perspective are con- sidered. The conclusion is drawn that the use of both theoretical frameworks could lead to more holistically serving college students.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Johnson, S.D., & Morelon-Quainoo, C. (2010). A sense of belonging: Socialization factors that influence the transitions of students of color in advanced-degree. Being and becoming a scholar. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2010). An Asset or an Obstacle? The Power of Peers in African American Women’s College Transition. From diplomas to doctorates: The success of Black women in higher education and its Implications for equal educational opportunities for all. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2010). College Choice as Life or Death: The College Choice and Transition Process of African American Wome. The Experiences of Black College Students: Enduring challenges, necessary supports. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2010). The Coleman Report. The Encyclopedia on African American Education. New York, NY: Sage Publications.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2010). Cultural Capital: The uses and abuses of a key theoretical concept in educational research [Monograph]. ASHE Higher Education Report Series 36(1), 133 pages.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Amid the increased use of the notion of cultural capital as a theoretical or analytical tool in educational research remain many different definitions, misconceptions, and appropriations of the concept. Cultural capital -- the cultural relevant knowledge, competencies, skills, or abilities valued in a particular context -- acts as a form of social currency in educational settings. This monograph extensively reviews the past thirty years of research, investigating the strengths and weaknesses regarding the widely varying uses of cultural capital in educational research. Although the concept of cultural capital holds great promise for explaining the perpetuation of power and privilege, unfilled hopes remain. The use of the economic metaphor implied by cultural capital, the lack of attention to race and gender inequalities, the possibility for misunderstanding in transferring the concept between countries, and a general implied deficiency model present limitations in many studies of cultural capital. An understanding of cultural capital, if appropriately theorized about and applied to research, has the promise of helping to understand and transform educational inequalities.
  • Johnson, S.D., Winkle-Wagner, R., & Kuykendall, J. (2009). Financing the dream: The impact of financial aid on graduate education for underrepresented minority students. Standing on the Outside Looking In: Standing on the Outside Looking In: Underrepresented students’ experiences in advanced degree programs. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Hunter, C.A., & Ortloff, D.H. (2009). Introduction: The not-center? The margins and educational research. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in educational research: Methods at the margins. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., & Nelson, J. (2009). Is higher education the great equalizer? Using the NELS: 88 dataset to examine early occupational attainmen. Enrollment Management Journal. 3(1), 10-29.
    Abstract: This study examines early occupational outcomes to evaluate the degree to which higher education acts as an equalizer in status attainment. Using the NELS dataset, this paper examines the effects of education, aspirations, background socioeconomic status, race, class, and gender on early occupational attainment. The results indicate that after controlling for background characteristics, early occupational opportunity still differs by race and gender, suggesting the importance of considering these categories in enrollment management decision. A college degree especially benefits males and Black females, yet college educated women and Black males still face early occupational status inequalities. As expected, aspirations were also found to impact early occupational attainment.
  • Ortloff, D.H., Hunter, C.A., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (2009). Methods at the margins: Realigning the center, A postscript. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in educational research: Methods at the margins. New York, NY: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Morelon-Quainoo, C., Winkle-Wagner, R., Johnson, S.D., Kuykendall, J., Ingram, T.N., Smith, D.G., Gilbert, K., & Santiague, L. (2009). The advanced-degree pipeline for graduate and professional students of color: Issues of access and choice. Standing on the Outside Looking In: Standing on the Outside Looking In: Underrepresented students’ experiences in advanced degree programs. Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2009). The perpetual homelessness of college experiences: The tensions between home and campus for African American women. The Review of Higher Education. 33(1), 1-36.
    Download Publication
  • Howard-Hamilton, M.F., Carla, M., Winkle-Wagner, R., Susan, J.D., & Lilia, S. (2009). Standing on the Outside Looking In: Underrepresented students’ experiences in advanced degree programs. In Mary Howard-Hamiklton, Carla Morelon-Quainoo, Rachelle Winkle-Wagner, Susan D. Johnson, Lilia Santiague (Eds.), Standing on the Outside Looking In: Underrepresented students’ experiences in advanced degree programs, (pp. 239 Pages). Herndon, VA: Stylus Publishing.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Compared to the literature on the impact of postsecondary institutions on undergraduates, the literature on the academic experiences of graduate students from underrepresented populations is relatively meager. This book remedies this gap by gathering a rich collection of personal narratives and empirical research to provide a comprehensive account of the campus climate for graduate students of color.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R. (2009). The Unchosen Me: Race, gender, and identity among Black women in college. The Unchosen Me: Race, gender, and identity among Black women in college., (pp. 227 pages). Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Racial and gender inequities persist among college students, despite ongoing efforts to combat them. Students of color face alienation, stereotyping, low expectaions, and lingering racism even as they actively engage in the academic and social worlds of college life. The Unchosen Me examines the experiences of African American collegiate women and the identity-related pressures they encounter both on and off campus.
  • Green, A., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (in press). A three-way analysis of diversity in HBCUs: Contemplating how diversity of methodologies and researcher backgrounds influences interpretations of data. Exploring issues of diversity within HBCU. New York, NY: Information Age Publishing.
  • McCoy, D.L., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (in press). Bridging the divide: Developing a scholarly habitus for aspiring graduate students through summer bridge program participation. Journal of College Student Development.
  • Kennedy, S.M., & Winkle-Wagner, R. (in press). Earning autonomy while maintaining family ties: Black women’s reflections on the transition into college. NASPA Journal about Women in Higher Education. pp. 30 pages.
    Abstract: African American women have made great strides in their college enrollment and graduation rates despite social and economic barriers. This interview study explores African American women’s reflections on their college adjustment processes during their sophomore year at a predominantly White university. The findings indicated the way that the women seemed to cope with the new situation was to use the strategy of maintaining familial support while developing an autonomous sense of self.

Presentations

  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & McCoy C, D.L., Presenter & Author (2014). Feeling like an “alien” or “family”? Comparing student and faculty perspectives on diversity in STEM disciplines at an HBCU and a PWI, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Philadelphia, PA.
  • McCoy, D.L., Presenter & Author, Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & Luedke, C., Presenter & Author (2013). Colorblind mentoring? A qualitative analysis of faculty mentoring of students of color, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), St. Louis, MO.
  • Hunter, C.A., Presenter & Author, Ortloff, D.H., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2013). Out of Our Comfort Zones: Teaching Qualitative Research at a Distance and Online, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Macrander, A., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2013). The Missing Box: Multiracial Student Identity Development at a “Predominately” White Institution, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Sule, V., Presenter & Author, Maramba, D., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2013). Who Deserves a Seat? Popular Opinion of College Access Policy, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.
  • Maramba, D., Presenter & Author, Sule, V., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2012). Accountability-for-diversity: A policy discourse analysis of the Texas Top Ten Percent Plan, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Las Vegas, NV.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & Conley, M., Presenter & Author (2012). “Fear of letting people down”: Black women’s reflections on social pressures in college, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Las Vegas, NV.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2012). A critical ethnographer tells life stories: Attempts at equality and engagement with African American women, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Vancouver, BC.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & McCoy, D., Presenter & Author (2012). Anticipatory socialization for underrepresented prospective doctoral students, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Vancouver, BC.
  • Ortloff, D.H., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2012). The space between the margin and center: Blurring difference lines in educational research, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Vancouver, BC.
  • McCoy, D., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2011). Bridging the divide: Developing a scholarly identity through participation in a summer bridge program, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Charlotte, NC.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2010). Finding an oasis: African American women’s reflections of counter- spaces in college, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Denver, CO.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & McKinney, M.T., Presenter & Author (2010). Where is cultural capital? Mapping the terrain of operationalizations and proxies of a key concept in higher education research, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Indianapolis, IN.
  • Lundy-Wagner, V., Presenter & Author, & Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2009). A harassing climate? The implications of sexual harassment for campus climate, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Vancouver, BC.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & McKinney, T.M., Presenter & Author (2009). Lives not narrowed down: The state of African American women’s experiences in higher education, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Vancouver, BC.
  • Morelon-Quainoo, C., Author Only, Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author, & Santiague, L., Presenter & Author (2009). Standing in the gap: The role and relevance of HBCUs in the advanced degree pipeline for underrepresented student, Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), Vancouver, BC.
  • Winkle-Wagner, R., Presenter & Author (2009). The challenges and potential of cultural capital in higher education research, American Educational Research Association (AERA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Diego, CA.

School Service

  • School of Education Qualitative Minor Committee
    Dates of Membership: Aug. 2012 - Aug. 2015
    Accomplishments: Advisory board for all qualitative coursework, including the minor, in the School of Education.
  • Member.

Public Service

  • Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) Publication Committee
    Dates of Membership: Nov. 2013 - Nov. 2017
    Accomplishments: Advisory board for the two top-tier research journals in the field of higher education that are associated with ASHE. Interview and select the next editor of the Review of Higher Education journal.
  • Board Member.

Awards and Honors

  • University of Wisconsin - Madison Fall Research Competition Award
    Organization: University of Wisconsin -Madison
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: UW Madison
    Description: Research funding for a study entitled, "A Portrait of the Self-Initiated Strategies for Success in College by African American Female College Alumni in Three Metropolitan Areas."
    Date(s): July 2013 - July 2014
  • 2012-2013 Mentoring Award, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis
    Organization: Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, UW-Madison
    Purpose: Teaching
    Scope: UW Madison
    Description: The student group in ELPA votes and awards faculty a mentoring award annually
    Date(s): May 2013
  • National Science Foundation (NSF), Delaware EPSCoR RII Sub-Award
    Organization: National Science Foundation (NSF), Delaware EPSCoR RII
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: Opening the Gates to Graduate-Level STEM Programs: The Needs of Underrepresented Students in the State of Delaware The purpose of this study was to examine access to graduate education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines for students of color.
    Date(s): January 1, 2011 - May 1, 2013
  • Layman Research Award
    Organization: University of Nebraska Foundation
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: Other University
    Description: Awarded competitive funding for a study of African American female college alumni reflections on college success.
    Date(s): June 2008 - May 2012
  • ASHE/Ford Foundation Critical Policy Institute on Qualitative Research Fellowship Recipient
    Organization: ASHE/Ford Foundation
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: Invited to attend a competitive summer institute focused on critical qualitative inquiry.
    Date(s): June 2009 - July 2009
  • Paul F. Fidder Research Grant Finalist
    Organization: Paul F. Fiddler Research Grant
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: Finalist for research grant to conduct research on access to doctoral programs for students of color.
  • William T. Grant Foundation Scholars Program, Semi-finalist
    Organization: William T. Grant Foundation
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: Semi-finalist for Scholars Program for a study of African American female alumni reflections on success in college.

Memberships

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA)
    Position Held: Division J Program Committee 2011, Scope of Organization: International, Membership Period: May 1, 2006 - May 1, 2015
  • Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE)
    Scope of Organization: National, Membership Period: 2005 - 2015
© 2014 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System • Please contact the School of Education External Relations Office with questions, issues or comments about this site.