Peter Goff

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Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis
School of Education
UW-Madison
253 Education Building
1000 Bascom Mall
MadisonWI  53706-1326

Tel: 608/262-3106
Fax: 608/265-3135

Email: elpa@education.wisc.edu
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Remember that our nation’s first great leaders were also our first great scholars. —John F. Kennedy

Professor Peter Trabert Goff

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Professor Peter Trabert Goff


Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis (ELPA)

270L Education Building  binoculars icon
Madison, WI 53706
Office: 608/262-3886

pgoff@wisc.edu

Education

Ph D, Leadership, Policy, & Organizations, School Leadership
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN


 

 

Scheduled Teaching

  • Fall 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2016 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2016 - School Finance and Resource Allocation
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 830, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2016 - Applied Statistics for School Leaders II
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 002, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2016 - Introduction to Quantitative Inquiry in Education
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 822, Section: 002, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2016 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2016 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 9, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2015 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2015 - Research Methods and Procedures in Educational Administration
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 725, Section: 002, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Fall 2015 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2015 - School Finance and Resource Allocation
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 830, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2015 - Applied Statistics for School Leaders II
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 002, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2015 - Data Analytics for District Level Leaders
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 502, Section: 004, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Undergraduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2015 - Data Analytics for District Level Leaders
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 012, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2015 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2015 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2015 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 9, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2014 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2014 - School Finance and Resource Allocation
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 830, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2014 - Applied Statistics for School Leaders II
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 002, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2014 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2014 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2014 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 9, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2013 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2013 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 067, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2013 - School Finance and Resource Allocation
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 830, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2013 - Applied Statistics for School Leaders II
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 003, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Summer 2013 - Seminar in Educational Finance
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 960, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Fall 2012 - School Finance and Resource Allocation
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 830, Section: 001, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
    Course Syllabus
     

Publications

  • Le, T., Bolt, D.M., Camburn, E., Goff, P., & Rohe, K. (in press). Latent factors in student-teacher interaction factor analysis. Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics.
  • Goff, P., Guthrie, J.E., Goldring, E., & Bickman, L. (in press). Changing Principals’ Leadership through Feedback and Coaching. Journal of Educational Administration.
    Abstract: In this study we used a multiyear, Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded randomized experiment to investigate the impact of feedback and coaching intervention on principals’ leadership behavior. In our sample of 52 elementary and middle schools, half of the principals received feedback only, while half received both feedback and coaching. We analyzed changes in teachers’ perceptions of principals’ actions as well as principals’ perceptions of their own actions. The findings show that principals who receive coaching are more likely to integrate teacher feedback into their leadership practices.
  • Goff, P., Goldring, E., & Bickman, L. (in press). Perceptual congruence between school principals and their teachers’ ratings of leadership effectiveness: Predicting the gap. Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability.
    Abstract: Purpose: Self-awareness theory posits that leaders who are more aware of their own strengths and weaknesses demonstrate superior leadership behaviors. The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which principals’ self-ratings of leadership effectiveness coincide with their teachers’ perceptions of their leadership effectiveness. Further, we explore several characteristics of teachers and principals in an attempt to identify the factors that may predict congruence in perceptions of leadership. Research Methods: This study draws from survey data of 76 elementary and middle school principals and over 2,100 teachers in a mid-sized urban district. Principals and teachers completed parallel forms of a 72-item Learning Centered Leadership scale (VAL-ED©). Teacher and principal characteristics are incorporated into a multivariate regression analysis. Findings: The extent of congruence is approximately normally distributed and centered on zero. The variance is also balanced with roughly half between schools and half within schools. Although there is zero difference in the overall sample, teachers and principals within any given school seldom share the same perspective. Teachers’ teaching experience was related to teacher ratings greater than principals’ while principals’ self-efficacy was a strong predictor of principals rating themselves higher than the teachers. Interestingly, the more time a teacher spent with a principal, the less congruence they shared. Implications for Research and Practice: This research has identified rather large disparities in perceptions of leadership between teachers and their principals. Such a gap suggests that teachers have information and perspectives on school leadership distinct from the principals’ information and perspectives. This research provides evidence that structured teacher feedback may provide a useful avenue for principals seeking additional perspectives on their leadership effectiveness.
  • Goff, P., Boesdorfer, S., & Hunter, W. (2012). Culture, chemistry, and the nature of science: The construction and evaluation of a novel chemistry curriculum. Cultural Studies in Science Education. 7(3), 631-651.
    Abstract: This research documents the creation, implementation, and evaluation of a novel chemistry curriculum. The curriculum allowed students to create theories situated in a variety of cultures while they investigated chemical phenomena central to all civilizations; it was a way of synthesizing chemistry, the history and nature of science, inquiry, and multicultural education. Achieving both chemistry content and nature of science objectives were the main goals of the curriculum. A small sample of undergraduate students participated in the curriculum instead of attending a large lecture course. The novel curriculum covered the same chemistry topics as the large lecture course. Program efficacy was evaluated using a combination of grades, survey data, and interviews with the participating undergraduates. The results suggest that this curriculum was a successful start at engaging students and teaching them chemistry as well as nature of science concepts.
  • Goff, P. (2012). Principals as Teachers: Measures of quality & distribution in the administrative labor supply.
    Abstract: This research investigates the extent to which quality measures of new leaders’ teaching experience relate to their matriculation into administration. In addition to conventional labor supply factors I look at value-added measures of teachers who become school leaders as well the value-added estimate of the school in which they taught. The second portion of the dissertation examines patterns in the mobility and distribution of administrators as they enter the leadership profession.
  • Goff, P., Mavrogordato, M., & Goldring, E. (2012). Instructional Leadership in Charter Schools: Is There an Organizational Effect or Are Leadership Practices the Result of Faculty Characteristics and Preferences? Leadership and Policy in Schools. 11(1), 1-25.
    Abstract: Notable differences in leadership practices in charter and public schools have been documented, as have differences in teacher attributes between these schooling sectors. Given that teachers are not distributed to charter and public schools at random but rather select (and are selected by) these institutions, we ask: To what extent do differences in teacher characteristics and preferences influence leadership practices across schools? This study applies regression analysis to assess the relationship between teacher characteristics and preferences and principal instructional leadership practices. Contrary to expectations, we find that teachers' characteristics and preferences do not shape their principal's instructional leadership practices.
  • Goldring, E., Goff, P., & Bickman, L. Coaching, Feedback, and School Leadership: A longitudinal Intervention. Manuscript in preparation.
    Abstract: This paper examines the impact of providing 52 school leaders with a year of teacher feedback regarding their learning-centered leadership followed by a year of feedback and leadership coaching. Results suggest that changing practice produces an initial dip in teachers' perceptions of school leadership. Implications are discussed.
  • Goff, P. Hiring the Best: A conceptual framework for the selection of new school leaders. Manuscript in preparation.
    Abstract: Hiring for school leadership is regarded as a critical component of the leadership pipeline. Identifying effective leadership is a challenging task and such difficulties are compounded when hiring those who have had no formal prior administrative experience. Drawing on empirical research and theory from human resource management, labor markets, and school leadership, this paper develops a framework to inform and guide the selection of new school leaders.
  • Goff, P. Principals as Teachers: An Inquiry into the Distribution of School Leaders. Manuscript in preparation.
    Abstract: This paper examines distributional patterns in the school leadership labor market, focusing particularly on new principals. This research examines how the characteristics of new leaders, such as their value-added score when they were a teacher and the value-added score of the school at which they taught, relate to characteristics of the school at which they accepted a position as a new leader. The rationale behind these particular measures is that high value-added teachers may have greater potential to develop into instructional leaders, while teachers who taught in high value-added schools were exposed to the cultures, norms, and organizational supports of highly effective schools and thus may be more likely to initiate and support similar functions as a school leader. Using a seven-year longitudinal panel of statewide data from Tennessee, I examine matriculation trends as teachers move into positions as school administrators. First, this paper updates current knowledge of the leadership pipeline through a presentation of descriptive findings, showing for example, that over half of all new administrators (52%) taught in a "high-stakes" subject, although these positions comprise only 35% of all instructional positions in Tennessee. Other descriptive results show that the administrative gender gap, although still skewed towards males, has closed considerably over the last 15 years. Additional geographic, organizational, and demographic descriptive findings will also be presented. Analytical findings show that individuals who were high value-added teachers or who taught at high value-added schools are more likely to accept a leadership position in a high value-added school. In these analyses level of analysis is the leadership position, the dependent variable is new leader characteristic (teacher or school VA), and characteristics of the hiring school (school VA, achievement, size, demographics and salary) are the independent variables. These findings suggest that the labor market for new leaders may be sensitive to indicators of teacher quality as a predictor for subsequent leadership capacity. As with all prior studies of the educational leadership labor market, this study is limited in that it cannot discern whether it is high VA candidates seeking out high VA schools, the converse, or some combination thereof. One finding that provides some optimism is that high caliber candidates (as measured by teacher and school VA) do not appear to be sorting into high achieving (i.e. high SES) schools, leaving open the possibility that their leadership skills may diffuse into lower achieving schools to bolster their growth and development. A more somber conclusion drawn from this work is that schools characterized by both low-growth and low-achievement appear unable to attract high-quality young leadership talent. Lacking strong leadership, these schools are unlikely to generate the growth needed to attract talented teachers and leaders and will not likely break this cycle without additional support.
  • Goff, P. Principals as Teachers: Measures of quality and differential matriculation in the school leadership labor supply. Manuscript in preparation.
    Abstract: Although school leadership is widely recognized as an essential component of highly effective schools, we know little regarding the qualities and characteristics of the teachers who choose to become school leaders or how these qualities and characteristics correspond to the types of schools they choose to lead. An examination of the existing research on effective leadership, effective teachers, and effective schools suggests that, upon moving to administrative positions, highly effective teachers or teachers who worked in highly effective schools may be more likely to display the leadership behaviors associated with improving student outcomes. It follows then, that introducing measures of school and teacher quality to analyses of administrative labor supply may yield fresh insights regarding school leadership. Results show that teacher and school quality are positively associated with matriculation into school leadership when comparisons are made among all teachers. However when comparisons are made among only teachers with administrative certificates these quality measures are not longer significant. Results also show that high quality teachers and teachers from high quality schools are more likely to move into leadership positions in other high quality schools. Additional descriptive findings are discussed, as are policy implications and possibilities for future research.
  • Goff, P., Goldring, E., & Canney, M. The Best Laid Plans: Leadership incentive programs under the Teacher Incentive Fund. Manuscript in preparation.
    Abstract: The goal of this research is to provide a descriptive overview of 33 principal incentive plans designed by practitioners and policy makers across the country over the last decade. Guided by the literature that outlines optimal design components, we compare the plans to prevailing theory. We find evidence that districts often lack the capacity to adequately develop pay-for-performance plans for school leaders. The implementation of poorly formulated plans will, at best be marginally effective, and at worst undermine district culture and the efforts of school leaders.

Departmental Service

  • Admissions
    Dates of Membership: 2012 - Pres.
    Accomplishments: Selection masters and doctoral applicants.
  • Committee Member. Period of Service: 2012 - Pres.

Awards and Honors

  • Grant - Labor Market Study
    Organization: WARF - Graduate School
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: State
    Description: Investigate trends in the WI labor market using a novel data set including teacher and administrator application data as well as administrative records.
    Date(s): September 2014 - August 2015
  • Grant - Data Driven Instruction Validation Study
    Organization: New Leaders
    Scope: National
    Description: Validation & reliability study examining two measures (data driven instructional knowledge and data driven team building). $100,000
    Date(s): September 2013 - August 2014
  • Grant - Evaluating School Leadership
    Organization: The Graduate School of UW-Madison
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: This $41,000 grant funds an inquiry into principals' perceptions of equitable evaluation policies and how such policies may differ for principals newly assigned to a school as compared to those with multiple years vested.
    Date(s): August 2013 - July 2014
  • Emerging Education Policy Scholars
    Organization: Fordham Foundation
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: National
    Description: Nominated to participate in a cohort of emerging policy scholars program. Group is involved in development activities to strengthen policy impact of education research.
    Date(s): January 2014

Memberships

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA)
    Scope of Organization: National
  • Association for Public Policy and Management (APPAM)
    Scope of Organization: National
  • The Association for Education Finance & Policy (AEFP)
    Scope of Organization: National
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