John Diamond

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Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis
School of Education
UW-Madison
253 Education Building
1000 Bascom Mall
MadisonWI  53706-1326

Tel: 608/262-3106
Fax: 608/265-3135

Email: elpa@education.wisc.edu
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Dr. John B. Diamond

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Dr. John B. Diamond

Hoefs Bascom Professor of Education
Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis (ELPA)

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jbdiamond@wisc.edu
Personal website: http://www.johnbdiamond.com/

251 Education Building  binoculars icon

Office: 608/263-3232

jbdiamond@wisc.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Biography

John B. Diamond is Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Education in ELPA and a faculty affiliate in Afro-American Studies and Educational Policy Studies. A sociologist of education, he studies the relationship between social inequality and educational opportunity. More specifically, he examines how educational leadership, policies, and practices shape students' educational opportunities and outcomes.



 

 

Teaching Interests

Race and Class Inequality, Leadership, Qualitative Research Methods, Urban and Suburban Schooling

Scheduled Teaching

  • Fall 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2016 - Race, Class, & Educational Inequality
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 003, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Fall 2016 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2016 - Field Study of Race, Poverty, & Inequality in Schools
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 004, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2016 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Summer 2016 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2015 - Independent Reading
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 999, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2015 - Race, Class & Educational Inequality
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 007, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Fall 2015 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Spring 2015 - Field Study of Race, Poverty, & Inequality in Schools
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 005, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2015 - Research or Thesis
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 990, Section: 068, Minimum Credit Hours: 1, Maximum Credit Hours: 12, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Individual
     
  • Fall 2014 - Race, Class, & Educational Inequality
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 006, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     
  • Spring 2014 - Race, Class, & Educational Inequality
    Course Prefix: 305, Course Number: 940, Section: 008, Maximum Credit Hours: 3, Course Level: Graduate, Course Delivery Mode: Lecture
     

Research Interests

Educational Policy, Leadership, Race and Education, Urban and Suburban Schooling

Publications

  • Lewis, A.E., & Diamond, J. (in press). Despite the Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: On the surface, Riverview High School looks like the post-racial ideal. Serving an enviably affluent, diverse, and liberal district, the school is well-funded, its teachers are well-trained, and many of its students are high-achieving. Yet Riverview has not escaped the same unrelenting question that plagues schools throughout America: why is it that even when all of the circumstances seem right, black and Latina/o students continue to lag behind their peers? Through five years' worth of interviews and data-gathering at Riverview, Amanda Lewis and John Diamond have created a powerful and illuminating study of how the racial achievement gap continues to afflict American schools more than fifty years after the formal dismantling of segregation. As students progress from elementary school to middle school to high school, their level of academic achievement increasingly tracks along racial lines, with white and Asian students maintaining higher GPAs and standardized testing scores, taking more advanced classes, and attaining better college admission results than their black and Latina/o counterparts. Most research to date has focused on the role of poverty, family stability, and other external influences in explaining poor performance at school, especially in urban contexts. Diamond and Lewis instead situate their research in a suburban school, and look at what factors within the school itself could be causing the disparity. Most crucially, they challenge many common explanations of the "racial achievement gap," exploring what race actually means in this situation, and how it matters. Diamond and Lewis' research brings clarity and data into a debate that is too often dominated by stereotyping, race-baiting, and demagoguery. An in-depth study with far-reaching consequences, Despite the Best Intentions revolutionizes our understanding of both the knotty problem of academic disparities and the larger question of the color line in American society.
  • Diamond, J. (in press). Implementing the Common Core: How Individuals, Organizational Resources, and Instructional Practice Matter. Challenging Standards Navigating Conflict and Building Capacity in the Era of the Common Core. Rowan and Littlefield.
    Online Publication/Abstract
  • Lewis, A.E., Diamond, J.B., & Forman, T. (2015). Conundrums of Integration: Desegregation in the context of Racial Hierarchy. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity. 1(1), 22-36.
    Abstract: Recent scholarly and public conversations have given renewed attention to integration as a goal, an aspiration, and/or an “imperative.” These calls for integration are infused with the conviction that segregation is a linchpin, if not the linchpin, of persistent racialized hierarchies. While the costs of persistent segregation remain clear, the call for integration as the unequivocal answer is more contested. In this article we grapple with some of these conundrums of integration, asking whether, in fact, integration furthers equity and if not, why not? To explore this issue we focus on an “integrated” space—Riverview, a successful high school known for its diversity—and drawing on theory from social psychology, we show how the promise of integration in such contexts is undermined. We conclude that while integration may well be a necessary condition to advance equity, it is not by itself a sufficient condition to ensure it.
  • Diamond, J., & Hughley, J.P. (2014). "Testing the Oppositional Culture Explanation in Desegregated Suburban Schools: The Impact of Racial Differences in Achievement Orientations on Academic Performance". Social Forces. 93(2), 747-777.
    Abstract: Recent studies suggest that anti-achievement attitudes and behaviors that are specific to black students occur most commonly in integrated or predominantly white school contexts. Accordingly, this study examines the degree to which racial differences in achievement-related attitudes and behaviors (collectively called academic orientations) actually contribute to corresponding differences in academic performance among nearly 25,000 students attending integrated secondary schools in the United States. The findings suggest that when controlling for socioeconomic status indicators, black students exhibit more pro-academic orientations than their white counterparts. School racial composition did not significantly influence these dynamics, and the racial composition of black students’ friend groups showed modest but inconsistent influence on academic orientations. Finally, the authors demonstrate that racial differences in expressed academic orientations have only negligible consequences for student performance, and thus do not show much promise for explaining or remedying black/white achievement disparities in secondary schools.
  • Diamond, J. (2013). Distributed Leadership: Examining Issues of Race, Power, and Inequality. In L. C. Tillman & J. J. Scheurich (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity.
  • Diamond, J. (2013). The Resource and Opportunity Gap: The Continued Significance of Race for African American Student Outcomes. In D. J. C. Andrews and F. Tuitt (Eds.), Contesting the Myth of a Post-Racial Era: The Continued Significance of Race in Education.. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishers.
  • Diamond, J. “Accountability Policy, School Organization, and Classroom Practice: Partial Recoupling and Educational Opportunity.”. Unpublished Manuscript, University of Wisconsin, Madison. 44(2), 151-182.
  • Diamond, J. (2011). “Black/White Disparities in Educational Outcomes: Rethinking Issues of Race, Culture, and Context.”. In N. E. Hill, T. L. Mann & H. E. Fitzgerald (Eds.), African American Children's Mental Health: Development and Context..
  • Diamond, J. (2007). Distributed Leadership in Practice. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
    Online Publication/Abstract
    Abstract: Distributed leadership has become an important term for educational policymakers, practitioners, and researchers in the United States and around the world, but there is much diversity in how the term is understood. Some use it as a synonym for democratic or participative leadership. This book examines what it means to take a distributed perspective based on extensive research and a rich theoretical perspective developed by experts in the field. Including numerous case studies of individual schools and providing empirically based accounts of school settings using a distributed perspective, this thorough volume: Explores how a distributed perspective is different from other frameworks for thinking about leadership. Provides clear examples of how taking a distributed perspective can help researchers understand and connect more directly to leadership practice. Illustrates that the day-to-day practice of leadership is an important line of inquiry for scholars and those interested in improving school leadership.
  • Diamond, J. (2007). Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Rethinking the Connection between High Stakes Accountability Policy and Classroom Instruction. Sociology of Education. 80(4), 285-313.
    Abstract: In this article, the author examines the link between high-stakes testing policies and classroom instruction. Using data from classroom observations and interviews with teachers, he argues that these policies influence instruction but are mediated by teachers and filtered through their collegial interactions. He shows that teachers link the influence of high-stakes testing policies to instructional content (the knowledge and skills that they emphasize) more often than pedagogy (how they engage students around instructional content). As a result, didactic instruction dominates, especially in predominantly low-income and African American schools, in a policy environment that encourages addressing racial and class achievement gaps by increasing the use of interactive forms of instruction. The author concludes that researchers should be cautious not to overstate the impact of these policies on pedagogy and educational equity.
  • Diamond, J. (2004). "High Stakes Accountability in Urban Elementary Schools: Challenging or Reproducing Inequality?". Teachers College Press. 106(6), 1140-1171.
    Abstract: In this article 1 , the authors use data from interviews and observations in four urban elementary schoolstwo high-performing and two probation schoolsto examine how schools respond to high-stakes accountability policies. The authors show that school responses to high-stakes accountability depend on the schools' accountability status. In probation schools, responses focus narrowly on complying with policy demands, focusing on improving the performance of certain students, within benchmark grades, and in certain subject areas. In contrast, higher performing schools emphasize enhancing the performance of all students regardless of grade level and across all subject areas. Given the concentration of poor students and students of color in the lowest performing schools, the authors conclude that issues of educational equity need to be given greater consideration in the implementation of high stakes accountability policies.
  • Diamond, J., Randolph, a., & Spillane, J.P. (2004). Teachers’ Expectations and Sense of Responsibility for Student Learning: The Implications of School Race, Class, and Organizational Habitus. Anthropolgy and Education Quarterly. 35(1), 75-98.
    Abstract: This article examines how the concentration of low-income African American students in urban elementary schools is deeply coupled with a levelingof teachers’ expectations of students and a reduction in their sense of responsibility for student learning. We argue that this process is rooted in school-based organizational habitus through which expectations of students become embedded in schools.We show that this process can be mediated if school leaders engage in practices designed to increase teachers’ sense of responsibility for student learning. [organizational habitus, race, class, teacher expectations]

Awards and Honors

  • Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
    Organization: Radcliffe Institute
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Description: The Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program annually selects and supports 50 leading artists and scholars who have both exceptional promise and demonstrated accomplishments.
    Date(s): August 2006 - June 2007
  • National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship
    Organization: Spencer Foundation
    Purpose: Scholarship/Research
    Scope: International
    Description: Administered by the National Academy of Education, the postdoctoral fellowships are designed to promote scholarship in the United States and abroad on matters relevant to the improvement of education in all its forms. Scholars anywhere in the world who have completed their doctorates within the last five years and who wish to conduct research related to education may apply.
    Date(s): July 2002 - July 2004

Memberships

  • American Educational Research Association (AERA)
    Scope of Organization: International, Member Since: June 1994
  • Association of Black Sociologists (ABS)
    Scope of Organization: National, Member Since: July 1, 1992
  • American Sociological Association (ASA)
    Position Held: Chair Graduate Student Paper Competition, Scope of Organization: International, Member Since: June 1991
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